Next General Assembly Meeting This Tuesday!

Tuesday, September 29th, 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Ocean Campus – MUB 240

We will celebrate our recent victories (come to find out what they are if you don’t already know) and strategize for more.

Please help with these or other potential projects:

  • Organize pickets in support of the faculty negotiations to win a fair contract. Teacher working conditions are student learning conditions!
  • Pressure our administration to focus on building enrollment. Instead they are focused on reducing classes in order to increase “productivity” (essentially the ratio of students/faculty in a class.)
  • End the push-out policies such as the aggressive payment policy that has pushed out hundreds if not thousands of low income students.
  • Fight land grabs.
  • End the state control. We need to get rid of the special trustee who has veto power over our democratically elected board of trustees. He is acting behind the scenes and on the behalf of the state chancellor to further carry out the agenda of the discredited ACCJC.



Our own board of trustees sent a written comment and will also send a representative to Washington to give oral comment. We are well on our way to putting this hammer for the corporate agenda out of business!
.We are organizing a team will go to the hearing in Washington D.C. to give oral public comments, as we did in December 2013. Our presence at that time was influential in their ultimate decision to put ACCJC on the “show cause” status.
Please donate online to help fund this effort!
Or you can send a check made out to
Save CCSF Coalition
1249 Hayes Street
San Francisco, CA  94117

Submit Public Comment to get the ACCJC Delisted! DEADLINE: Sept 25, 2015

This is our opportunity to put this rogue agency out of business!.

Must be submitted by email by Sept. 25th

INSTRUCTION: For Non-CCSF People to Submit
Must be submitted by email by Sept. 25th

Must be submitted by email by Sept. 25th to reserve your spot to appear in Wash. D.C. on Dec 16-18, 2015
The Secretary’s letter from DOE to ACCJC

Click here for a detailed explanation of how the renewal process for an accrediting agency works and where the ACCJC is in this process.

A team from CCSF will go to the hearing in Washington, D.C. on December 16-18, 2015 to submit oral public comments, as we did in December 2013. Our presence at that time was influential in their decision to put ACCJC on their own “show-cause” status.

Please donate online to help fund this effort!
Or you can send a check made out to
Save CCSF Coalition
1249 Hayes St.
San Francisco, CA 94117

The Brief Story:
The ACCJC gets its authority from the US Department of Education (DOE). Many of you are aware that, spurred by the CFT complaint filed in April 2013, the DOE issued a letter to the ACCJC identifying 15 federal regulations with which the ACCJC was out of compliance. They were given a year to come into compliance, essentially putting them on their own “show cause.”

The ACCJC will come before a NACIQI (National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity) hearing this December. NACIQI will consider various documents including ACCJC’s report, a staff analysis report, and written third party comments. Oral third party comments will be allowed at the hearing. Then NACIQI will then make a recommendation to the DOE as to whether or not to reauthorize the ACCJC.

A More Detailed Story:
Click here for a more detailed explanation of how the renewal process for an accrediting agency works and where the ACCJC is in this process.


The recently released and long-awaited California Community College Chancellor’s Task Force Report on Accreditation and the practices of the ACCJC confirms unequivocally that the agency is no longer widely accepted by educators and educational institutions. The report, compiled by a blue-ribbon panel of California community college experts, including college presidents, administrators, elected trustees, and faculty, found that the “California Community College system and its member institutions have lost confidence in the ACCJC” and that the colleges and the system need to transition to another accreditor. Read the articles!


The PUC-owned western half of Balboa Reservoir has been designated for development and sale to private interests to increase available housing stock in SF.

The second Balboa Reservoir Community Advisory Committee will meet on Monday September 14th, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. in the Lick-Wilmerding Cafeteria. (755 Ocean Avenue – across the street from the CCSF Wellness Center.).

The main subjects of the 9/14 meeting will be:parking lot full

  1. Housing parameters
  2. Urban design & neighborhood character
  3. CCSF Master Plan update

State Chancellor’s Task Force Says: Dump the ACCJC!


Read the articles!

SF Examiner
Report urges new accreditor for California community colleges
City College Was Right All Along About Accreditors

College accreditation group should be replaced, task force says

Inside Higher Ed
California Community Colleges May Seek New Accreditor
Trouble for an Accreditor

Task force report urges new California community college accreditor

AFT 2121
Accreditation Task Force Report: Get Rid of ACCJC!

Chancellor’s Task Force calls for new accreditor
ACCJC Dealt Serious Setback (AFT – American Federation of Teachers)

News Release from SF City Attorney Dennis Herrera
Herrera praises call to replace ACCJC by Chancellor’s Accreditation Task Force

Our Work Is Still Needed!

Come to the SAVE CCSF GENERAL ASSEMBLY meeting: September 1st, Tues 5:30-7:30pm, MUB 240

First let’s relish our victories:

  • CCSF remains OPEN AND ACCREDITED!WeAreCityCollege
  • We have a new (and vastly improved) chancellor!
  • The worst aspects of the ill-advised reorganization plan have been halted.
  • We have a new location for our Civic Center campus.
  • Our Board of Trustees have (most of) their powers back.
  • ACCJC has a vastly tarnished reputation and legislation is in the works–already passed by an overwhelming majority in the State Assembly–that will place some oversight over its operations. Additionally, they may not survive their probationary status with the DOE at upcoming hearing in December.

Now some inconvenient truths:

  • CCSF remains under state control
    The Special Trustee appointed by the un-elected Board of Governors, has veto power over all decisions by the locally elected Board of Trustees.
    We need to demand return of our school to local control!
  • CCSF remains under the thumb of the ACCJC
    Under the guise of Restoration we are required to achieve 100% “perfection” by January 2017, a standard that no college could meet, including any of the colleges of the ACCJC commissioners. The ACCJC claims to care only about “meeting standards” but their agenda for CCSF embraces a much smaller, corporate-model community college with a narrowed mission to get rid of life-long learners, non-credit and part-time students while at the same time attacking part-time faculty benefits, union busting, eroding powers of the elected trustees, focusing solely on workforce training, and squeezing out Diversity Studies and more marginal students.
    We need to fight these detrimental ACCJC-imposed policies.
  • Enrollment MIS-management continues
    The failure of administration to counter negative press, the bungled closure of Civic Center’s Eddy campus, the implementation of unnecessary local push-out policies, and bureaucratic barriers have caused enrollment to plummet.
    We need to push for effective enrollment management and against this “right-sizing” of our college.
  • Our Campuses are in danger of being sold off (or leased for 99 years – same thing)
    The Board of Trustees is currently considering the leasing of 33 Gough St. with no real input from stakeholders or the affordable housing community.
    We need to halt this process until our board has full power with no threat of Special Trustee veto.
  • The Performing Arts Education Center was improperly cancelled by STWEP I and remains in limbo.
    CCSF and the community need this important resource that SF voted for twice.
  • A fair contract for faculty is not an administration priority
    The district appears to be taking a divide and conquer strategy to create a rift between part-timers and full-timers so as to undermine faculty strength and force unnecessary concessions.
    We need be in solidarity and strengthen our union to win a fair contract.


  • Sign the petition to refrain from cancelling classes before the add/drop date.
  • Come to the BOT meeting to send these messages to trustees: August 27, Thurs probably 4:00pm, MUB 140
  • Come to the SAVE CCSF GENERAL ASSEMBLY meeting: September 1st, Tues 5:30-7:30pm, MUB 240
  • Support Faculty Contract Negotiations: Faculty should vote in favor of the September referendum to establish a Hardship Fund in the event of a strike, and urge colleagues to do the same.
  • Stay informed: Send your email address to with message “Add me to the newsletter!”

The fight to save City College: Push back against push-out

July 28, 2015
by Helena Worthen and Joe Berry

The fight to save City College is taking place on two levels. We’re winning one but losing the other.


Between the courts, the legislature and political pressure in the streets, City College has made significant advances in the struggle to retain accreditation, despite the attempts by the Accrediting Commission of Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) to shut the college down. Many elected and appointed city and state leaders have taken action to preserve City College as an accredited, accessible, community-friendly institution that serves all of San Francisco. Read More


Stop the Freight Train at 33 Gough

No Land Grab

The Save City College Coalition calls for stopping the freight train to sell 33 Gough to a market-rate real estate developer (a 99 year lease is effectively a sale). Under the state takeover still imposed on the college, this project is now being rammed through at high speed, with a vote at the Board of Trustees possibly coming as early as August 20th. This action appears to violate the letter or the spirit of State Government Code 54220, which requires all local agencies, when disposing of public properties, to notify the local affordable housing, parks, and school agencies, and give those agencies a first right to negotiate. The project would still require environmental review and planning approvals from the Department of City Planning.

 We urge the Board of Trustees and the Board of Supervisors to join us in halting the rush to real estate development by adopting two principles:

1. No real estate transactions regarding 33 Gough Street or other properties shall be negotiated until the state takeover of City College has ended. This means: (a) no state-appointed Special Trustee (with or without Extraordinary Powers, since either one can overrule any Board decision); (b) the elected Board of Trustees restored to full authority; (c) an honest process of public deliberation.2.  The BOT and the BOS shall operate in a framework of strong commitment to truly affordable housing, working with the local affordable housing community. This means principled implementation of the legally required San Francisco housing element of the City’s General Plan, which calls for 60% of housing built to be affordable to low and moderate-income residents. The best scenario would be 33% of units for low income, and another 30-33% for moderate-income residents. The only way to achieve these goals is for public agencies to dedicate sites that are no longer used for their original public purpose, for affordable housing.


33 Gough is in the hottest real estate market in the US, on the freeway to Silicon Valley, and very close to 2000 new luxury condo high-rises and tech companies such as Uber and Twitter. In a land-hungry city, this parcel of 46,000 square feet is worth tens of millions of dollars.

For San Francisco, the sale of irreplaceable public land–in a city being rapidly emptied of its working class, low-income and middle class people–is a matter of great consequence. Communities urgently need affordable housing. City College urgently needs to rebuild enrollment of our community-based student body; stabilize finances battered by the accreditation nightmare and the state takeover; fund building maintenance; complete the Performing Arts Education Center; and find ways to house staff, faculty, and community members.

We agree with community housing advocates that City College can have it both ways—receive a fair price for its property, and make sure the land is used for affordable housing. It would be a terrible mistake to make a short-sighted deal, taking what we’re told is the most cash now, while watching our neighbors, our students and our own faculty and staff be pushed out of the City. Google employees and international glitterati are not likely to enroll at City College. These issues are of permanent consequence, and must be decided with the full participation of a well-informed public, the impacted communities and the local affordable housing community.